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Conch Republic Independence...Update and the Backstory

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The new dates for the celebration of Conch Independence this year are November 27 - December 6.

It's always a fun week, and will be this year. Maybe we can be thinking this way: "Good things come to those who wait." Hey, we're right there with you and ready for this virus to get behind us. Here's the link to keep track of this years "delayed" celebration: Conch Republic

If you're wondering how the "Conch Independence" movement got rolling, keep reading...

Key West started appearing on European maps and documents in the mid-1600’s. It wasn’t until 1819 that all of Florida was ceded to the United States.

The Conch Republic, its origins and brief cessation from the USA, is another story all together…and one that took place not that long ago and has its roots in economic hardship. As Paul Harvey would say, here’s “The rest of the story”.

Back in early 1982 the Florida Keys found themselves overcome by border patrol agents. The crisis reached a climax when the US Government put border checks on both Route 905A and Highway US 1 - the only two roads in and out of the Keys.

Cars and trucks began to stack up on both roads, up to 17-mile long stalemates traffic jam formed.

Soon, the freeway freeze-up made national headlines and local business owners were receiving cancelations from tourists concerned they could get into, but not out of, the Keys.

Tension continued to climb – while border agents claimed they were on the lookout for illegal aliens, the easygoing folks around town felt it was becoming a major inconvenience and creating a substantial financial impact.

A meeting was called of major influencers from the area, talks were held, beers were drunk, decisions were made and soon…a new nation was formed.

On April 23rd, 1982 the mayor at the time of the “Great Inconvenience”made a formal declaration of war against the United States on behalf of the newly formed Conch Republic.

While the conflict lasted mere moments, it was enough to establish the brand new micro-nation as independent. Soon, residents cheerfully claimed Key West had officially “Seceded where others had failed.”A mantra the townspeople would adopt as a slogan.

 

Although the United States never recognized the new diplomatic nation, nor its terms of surrender and request for $1 billion dollars of foreign aid, the townsfolk, and visitors alike, have continued to view the Conch Republic as its own 5th World country.

In fact, in 1990 – as the 8th Anniversary of the historic traffic jam and subsequent secession grew closer; a committee was formed to plan an official Conch Republic Independence Day.

Like all Key West traditions, what was originally a brainstorm for a daylong celebration slowly grew to be a weeklong recognition of good times, good vibes, and stale bread.

The official Independence Day is recorded as April 23rd. The list of the events is filled with various odd activities but the highlights include: sponsored bar crawls, live music, military displays, the election of leaders, and the World Famous Drag (Queen) Races down Duvall Street.

Everything culminates at the waters edge with an officially sanctioned engagement of the U.S Coast Guard. Locals charter boats, stock up on stale Cubano rolls (the official weapon of choice of the Conch Republic) and face off against Coast Guard ships posted on the bay.

The USCG tends to prefer water cannons to crusty bread but both parties are generally evenly matched. As vintage bi-planes bomb the vessels from above with Marine issue biodegradable toilet paper the battle usually comes to a close when the US forces officially surrender, as they have since 1990.

The Conch Republic truly embodies the spirit of those who live in or choose to visit the Florida Keys, with the mission to simply bring “Humor, Warmth, and Respect to a World in Need.”

So if you find yourself heading south on US Highway 1 in late November or early December this year, make sure you take some time to stop in for a visit.

 


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